TOPIC: Civilization

Santa Barbara disaster inevitable with Big Oil’s capture of regulatory apparatus

Oil on the beach at Refugio State Park in Santa Barbara, California, on May 19, 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard)

05.28.15 - The same region devastated by the Santa Barbara Oil Spill of 1969 is now the scene of a massive clean up of crude oil by the state and federal governments and volunteers. The international and national media have spread throughout the world the startling images of the oil soaked beaches, birds, fish and ecosystem in a deluge of TV, radio, newspaper and internet reports. Read…

To Celebrate Plants & Animals You Would Have to Destroy Them

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04.29.15 - The East Bay Zoological Society is advancing their “Zoo Master Plan” to expand the Oakland Zoo into an undeveloped four-hundred fifty three acre region in the East Oakland highlands that is a part of the Ohlone tribe’s Huchiun territory, and commonly referred to as Knowland Park. The development plan consists of fifty structures including paved roadways, “native animal conservation” exhibits, an aerial gondola, an interpretive center, an overnight campground, a gift shop, concession stands, an office complex, and a high-end restaurant. The “California Trail” proposal demarcates a 56 acre land grab for private development. Effectively, this development would fragment and degrade native wildlands along with high-quality wildlife habitat. This open-space land will be removed from public access and transformed into a conservation theme park which will be under the management of a private non-profit known as the East Bay Zoological Society (EBZS). The “California Native” conservation exhibit will display captive regionally-extinct California animals, including mountain lion, bear, and wolf exhibits. Read…

There is No Drought: California’s Twisted Water Ways

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12.26.14 - For millions of years, the rivers lacing through the lands now known as California meandered freely from the mountains to the oceans. Rain fell on the robust redwood forests in the north, slowly trickling through layers of soil, sand, and rock to fill the streams and aquifers that in turn fed the rivers. Where these rivers met the ocean, as they still do today in the Bay Delta, marshy estuaries flourished with abundant wildlife. Humans arrived, the ancestors of surviving native peoples like the Ohlone and Winnemem Wintu, and they lived in balance with their home for thousands of years. There were wet years and there were dry years, but the healthy network of natural aquifers continued to sustain life. Read…

Help Out Free Radical Radio: A Pirate Radio Podcast

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09.01.14 - Free Radical Radio is an anti-civilization anarchist podcast and radio show. Every week for almost two hours, broadcasting as part of the Berkeley Liberation Radio (BLR) Collective in West Oakland, Free Radical Radio has brought thousands of listeners thoroughgoing anti-civilization analysis and direct action news. Read…